5 inventions that could revolutionize access to clean water in India

It’s no news that India has a severe shortage of supply of clean water, especially in rural regions. These inventions could just turn that around.


Recently, the ALS ice bucket challenge swept the United States, and through social media millions of Americans have learned about the disease, dumped buckets of ice water over their heads and donated to a worthy cause.

While the ice bucket part of the challenge is probably what made it so popular, some have pointed out that it wastes a lot of water, and many people around the world do not have clean drinking water, let alone excess water to pour over their heads.

This has led one woman, Manju Latha Kalanidhi, to start her own “rice bucket challenge” meant to raise awareness for the high percentage of malnourished and dehydrated people in India. According to water.org, over 103.8 million people in India do not have clean drinking water.

Part of the problem with the conditions in India is that there is a high instance of poverty, and many people do not have the funds for water improvement systems. In the United States, monitoring your water quality is a popular option, but this can be expensive and may not be realistic for those who don’t have enough money for basic necessities. Fortunately, there are several promising technologies out there that could give people in India access to clean drinking water. Here are a few examples of solutions to the country’s water quality problem.

1. SlingShot

Slingshot

Image Credits:Lifesaver

The SlingShot is a powerful machine that can generate up to 1,000 liters of potable water per day for a community. It can make any contaminated water, even sewage, safe enough for human consumption. SlingShot also generates a small amount of electricity, which could be used towards lighting or cooling. The only problem with SlingShot is the price tag. A unit costs about $2,000, so it would only be practical for use by a whole village. However, it could be an effective long-term solution for some places in the country.

2. HOPE Project

Image Credits: www.projectmanana.org

Image Credits: www.projectmanana.org

Stellenbosch University’s Water Institute is investing in something it calls the HOPE Project, which involves the production of inexpensive, reusable water bottles with innovative filters on the inside. These filters would remove bacteria and particulates through carbon nanofibers. The filters aren’t just technologically advanced — they’re also very inexpensive. Each filter would cost about half a cent, making the HOPE Project an attractive option for impoverished countries like India.

3. Midomo

Image Credits: schemamag.ca

Image Credits: schemamag.ca

The Midomo machine is a filtration system which can transport clean water to different areas. This system is especially ideal for dry regions where water is particularly scarce and people may need to transport water over long distances. The Midomo system, which holds up to 50 liters of water at a time, fits on a car and people can easily push it from place to place. To offset the cost of the system for people who need it, Midomo is selling a bracelet for around $435. The idea is that people who are interested in donating to the cause will purchase the bracelet, and Midomo will donate the system to those who need it.

4. LIFESAVER Jerrycan

Image credits: WaterIsLife

Image credits: WaterIsLife

The LIFESAVER Jerrycan is a moderate-sized container with an ultrafiltration system. It can hold up to 18.5 liters of water and filters about 20,000 liters in its lifetime, so it’s ideal for families and smaller communities. It is also fairly economical as the cost of filtration per liter is only about 15 cents. One interesting feature of the Jerrycan is that it has a fairly high water pour rate of about three liters per minute. Some of the other filtration systems filter water more slowly.

5. The Straw

Image Credits: Popular Science

Image Credits: Popular Science

The Water is Life straw is literally what it sounds like — a straw with a filter inside. Users drink through the straw to clean the water, although manufacturers recommend the first sip taken with the straw should be spit out. The straw’s filter has three components — a charcoal filter, iodide crystal chamber and membrane filter. These neutralize viruses and bacteria, remove harmful substances and improve the taste of the water.

The filter lasts about a year and will clog when it no longer works. At about $10 each, it’s also a fairly cost-effective option. It’s ideal for personal use, especially by children and those with weakened immune systems, and can be worn around the neck.

These are just a few of the filtration systems at there that use advanced technology and could possibly be solutions to the water crisis in India.


  ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Kayla Matthews is a healthy living blogger with a passion for sustainable foods, Green initiatives and eco-friendly movements. You can read all of her latest posts by following her on Google+ and Twitter. more

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  ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Kayla Matthews is a healthy living blogger with a passion for sustainable foods, Green initiatives and eco-friendly movements. You can read all of her latest posts by following her on Google+ and Twitter. more

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