Food for Change: Langar comes to the aid of Syrian refugees

A Sikh group is using its tradition kitchen to feed Syrian refugees.


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Langar Aid facebook page

One of the worst humanitarian crises of our time, the Syrian issue has attracted attention of international media and several organisation who have been trying to alleviate the condition of those in need. Some have not been as kind as others, with several reports of the plight of refugees flooding in everyday, including the highly contemptible act of the Hungarian police opening fire on Syrian immigrants at the Croatian border.

At this juncture of history where several communities and countries are being pushed to rethink their policies and humanity at large, a Sikh group is using its tradition kitchen to feed several refugees who have been forced to leave their home due to the terror caused by ISIS.

The ‘langar’ as it is traditionally called, has been set up to provide bread to the Yazidis of the area as ISIS was ruining all the food being sent to them. Currently a group of volunteers are working extensively to provide aid to the people. While Khalsa Aid provided the machinery and Joint Help for Kurdistan gave a new building to house the bakery, the local government in Duhok is providing free power. Help is being provided by Sweden, Serbia and Greece as well.

On the other side of Syria, on the Lebanon-Syrian border, the organization is helping refugees by running a school for 5,000 local children. “The idea is to take the langar outside the walls of the gurdwara and share food with people who need it the most,” said Indy Hothy, a UK based economist-cum volunteer of the Indian origin.


  ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Literature student. Part time journalist. Harbouring crazy dreams of changing the world since 1993. more

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  ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Literature student. Part time journalist. Harbouring crazy dreams of changing the world since 1993. more
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